Online Newsrooms See Increase in Mobile Traffic-Our Mobile News Survey Report Reveals

Online Newsrooms See Increase in Mobile Traffic-Our Mobile News Survey Report Reveals

If you’ve been out shopping—or sitting at a coffee shop, or waiting in line, or doing just about anything, anywhere—you’ve no doubt observed that everyone seems to be on some kind of mobile device nearly all the time. Even before the results of the TEKGROUP  Mobile News Survey were tabulated, we had been seeing considerable increases in the share of mobile traffic coming to our clients’ newsrooms. The survey findings confirmed what we suspected: in the two years since we conducted our first study of mobile users: there have been considerable jumps in both the use of mobile devices and in the importance consumers place on mobile. 
How to Earn Media With Email, Social and Mobile in Your Online Newsroom

How to Earn Media With Email, Social and Mobile in Your Online Newsroom

Journalists like receiving your emails, they use Facebook when conducting research on companies and organizations, and they expect your online newsroom to be mobile-friendly.  These are just three findings from our 2015 Online Newsroom Survey, in which we asked journalists about online newsrooms and how they use them. To make sure your online newsroom is useful to journalists, you need to do a great job with traditional PR elements such as press releases. But to reach out to journalists and persuade them to cover your news, you’ll also want to ace email alerts, provide an integrated social media experience and do it all on an mobile-friendly online newsroom platform. 
What Journalism’s Shift to Digital Means for Your Online Newsroom

What Journalism’s Shift to Digital Means for Your Online Newsroom

Long gone are the days when digital-only publications were seen as less prestigious or less trustworthy than their paper-based peers. According to the Pew Research Center, as print newsrooms cut back on editorial staff, thousands of journalists have migrated to small and large native digital news outlets. What does this shift to digital journalism mean for companies and other organizations trying to market their news? There are several implications you’ll want to consider . . . 
Content Beyond Text: The Multimedia Features Journalists Seek in an Online Newsroom

Content Beyond Text: The Multimedia Features Journalists Seek in an Online Newsroom

In our last post, we looked at three content features— PR contacts, press releases and breaking news—that journalists ranked high in importance in the 2015 Online Newsroom Survey Report. But in today’s digital world, “content” is defined more broadly than “text,” so in this post we’ll explore the multimedia elements of an online newsroom—things like photos, videos and audio files—and their relative importance among the journalists we surveyed. We’ll also take a look at online newsrooms that do multimedia well.
Survey Says: Build Your Online Newsroom With These Key Components

Survey Says: Build Your Online Newsroom With These Key Components

This year in our annual Online Newsroom Survey Report, we took a deeper look at the types of content, features and functionality journalists value in an online newsroom. When asked about the importance of newsroom components, journalists gave high rankings to both the most traditional elements of public relations and to the “new media” elements of an online newsroom—things like mobile access and social integration.
The Future of News is Mobile, Just Ask CNN

The Future of News is Mobile, Just Ask CNN

If you’re still wondering whether moving your online newsroom to a responsive design platform is a worthwhile investment, the recent release of Snapchat’s long-awaited news tool, Discover, should erase any residual doubt.  The app lets media outlets post mini-sized content on Snapchat, whose average user is only 18 years old. Ten media outlets, including CNN, ESPN, and National Geographic, are publishing news on Discover in an attempt to reach young people, who are notoriously avoidant of traditional news media.
Content Marketing Boosts SEO, But Distribution is Still Key to Success

Content Marketing Boosts SEO, But Distribution is Still Key to Success

According to a recent post on Search Engine Watch and, let’s face it, common sense, 93% of online research begins with search engines, and businesses that publish high-quality long-form content frequently tend to do better in search engine rankings. And while 87% of buyers say that content has an impact on their purchasing decisions, 43% say hard selling is a turn-off, two stats that together suggest the power of educational, informative content.
Marketers Aim to Mine “Dark Social” for Data

Marketers Aim to Mine “Dark Social” for Data

“Dark social” conjures images of vampires sipping blood cocktails or, far worse, a mandatory corporate happy hour with bad wine. But according to Tom Edwards, writing for Social Media Insider, “dark social” means something very specific to digital geeks—it’s the sharing activity largely invisible to analytics that originates from instant messages, emails and ephemeral social platforms such as WhatsApp, Snapchat and WeChat.  
As Social Media Become More Powerful, the Key Players Shift Positions

As Social Media Become More Powerful, the Key Players Shift Positions

As social media become more and more important to marketers, the key players are shifting positions. A new study in the UK showed LinkedIn eclipsing Twitter as the number one social network for content marketing, with 96% of respondents saying they used LinkedIn to distribute content in 2014. Twitter was 7 points behind, with 89% saying they used the micro-blogging platform to distribute content. Only 69% of respondents said they used Facebook to distribute content in 2014. A separate study from GlobalWedIndex found that although Facebook has more than 1.3 billion monthly users, just half (52%) describe themselves as “active” on the platform in late 2014, compared with 70% in late 2012.
Digital Technologies Don’t Cause Stress—They Make Us Smarter

Digital Technologies Don’t Cause Stress—They Make Us Smarter

Every new medium or technology has generated worry—in the 18th and 19th centuries, the then “new” novel was thought to be the ruin of its young female readers. Television, it was feared, would make us numb and dumb. And then came the internet, with mobile and social media on its heels. Taken together, all of these digital technologies and the glut of constant information they provide have widely been thought to increase psychological stress. But according to a new study from the Pew Research Center, frequent use of digital media does not appear to be related to higher stress levels.